REDUX: A Young Person’s Guide To: No Wave

August 1, 2014

A+M Records | US | PicDisc LP | 1979 | PR 4738

A+M Records | US | PicDisc LP | 1979 | PR 4738

Various Artists: No Wave US PicDisc LP [1978]

  1. U.K. Squeeze: Take Me I’m Yours
  2. The Police: Roxanne
  3. Joe Jackson: Got The Time
  4. Klark Kent: Don’t Care
  5. The Secret: I’m Alive
  6. The Stranglers: Bring On The Nubiles
  7. U.K. Squeeze: Strong In Reason
  8. Joe Jackson: Sunday Papers
  9. The Dickies: Give It Back
  10. The Police: Next To You
  11. The Stranglers: Nice N’ Sleazy
  12. The Dickies: You Drive Me Ape (You Big Gorilla)

There also existed a US picture disc LP of this same title! I’m certain that chasinvictoria must have one of these in storage as well. The album featured the same, delightful cover art on the A-side, but the B-side was completely out to lunch.

I want an anchovy to go… and hold the pizza!

I want an anchovy to go… and hold the pizza!

Almost literally since the album was not titled “No Wave… To Go! Why Pizza? Well, it was round. The PicDisc version was a numbered edition [probably less than 5K, I’m guessing] and it came in the requisite clear PVC sleeve that such editions sported. For that reason, the credits were appended to the B-side of the sleeve on a sticker. The A-side featured a cheap come-on and both of these are reproduced below.

hype sticker a-go-go

hype sticker a-go-go

liner notes

liner notes

Seeing that tells us that Joe Jackson was not yet assaulting the pop charts since this album featured two pre-release cuts from “Look Sharp” which had yet to be released according to this test pressing dated December 5, 1978. So wow, this was not a case of putting a breakout artist on this sampler as Jackson had yet to hit the bins, much less wrangle his way onto the FM Rock airwaves.

If you clicked the link yesterday for Ron Moss, the A+R coordinator of this album, he told an informative tale on his LinkedIn page. He gives credit where credit is due, citing Derek Green, the man who ran A+M’s UK division [and famously signed the Sex Pistols]. So this was a case of a mentor influencing Moss, and this tells us that Derek Green was probably the man at A+M who we can thank for all of the unusual signings that they brought to American record stores.

Oh Canada!

But this record didn’t just appear in American record stores! There also exists a Canadian version of this album which looks like this:

A+M Records | CAN |LP | 1978 | PR 4738

A+M Records | CAN |LP | 1978 | PR 4738

Various Artists: No Wave CAN LP [1978]

  1. U.K. Squeeze: Take Me I’m Yours
  2. The Police: Roxanne
  3. Joe Jackson: Got The Time
  4. Klark Kent: Don’t Care
  5. The Secret: I’m Alive
  6. David Kubinec: Somethings Never Change
  7. U.K. Squeeze: Strong In Reason
  8. Joe Jackson: Sunday Papers
  9. The Dickies: Give It Back
  10. The Police: Next To You
  11. David Kubinec: Another Lone Ranger
  12. The Dickies: You Drive Me Ape (You Big Gorilla)

…but two of these things are not like the other. Did you spot the difference? Some Canadian A+M employee probably blanched when playing the test pressing of this puppy and changes were made, no matter what the cover said! The cover touts The Stranglers, but one David Kubinec found two tracks produced by A+M staff producer John Cale from his 1978 album “Somethings Never Change”in the place of “Bring On The Nubiles” and even “Nice + Sleazy!” I’m all but certain that chasinvictoria probably has one of these in his home, so perhaps he can tell us more.

Back In The UK

Yesterday, commenter Nick brought to my attention the heretofore unknown fact that there is also a UK edition of this album and it is so different as to be practically another release entirely… which is why it is not linked in the Discogs.com database with the North American edition in any way. Discogs are funny about that sort of thing. Same label,. Same title. Half of the same tracks… nope. It’s a stand-alone release with its own deep entry in their database. And deep is it because this album came in a bewildering array of colored vinyl options and a drastically different cover as evidenced below.

A+M Records | UK | LP | 1979 | AMLE 68505

A+M Records | UK | LP | 1979 | AMLE 68505

Various Artists: No Wave UK LP [1979]

  1. The Secret: Going Down Again
  2. Joe Jackson: Is She Really Going Out With Him?
  3. The Police: Roxanne
  4. Klark Kent: Don’t Care
  5. David Kubinec: Love In The First Degree
  6. Bobby Henry: Head Case
  7. Squeeze: Take Me, I’m Yours
  8. The Dickies: You Drive Me Ape [You Big Gorilla]
  9. The Secret: Lucky Lizard
  10. Squeeze: Bang Bang
  11. David Kubinec: Line Shooter
  12. Shrink: Valid Or Void
  13. Klark Kent: Office Girls
  14. Joe Jackson: Sunday Papers
  15. The Police: Can’t Stand Losing You
  16. The Dickies: Hideous

This puppy came in four different colors: opalescent, purple, orange, and blue. It featured four more cuts, with no Stranglers in evidence, since they were signed to UA in their native land. Once again, David Kubinec figures again in the mix, and The Secret get two cuts here. The one gem for my eyes is the Klark Kent B-side, “Office Talk.” Then there are two cuts from the Oval/A+M Records label that I had never heard of before.

Oval/A+M | UK | 10" | 1978 | AMSP 7468

Oval/A+M | UK | 10″ | 1979 | AMSP 7468

Shrink released a titular 10″ EP but the “Valid Or Void” track same from a non-LP single. It’s hard to tell from the cover art, but the enigmatic Shrink had the whiff of glam too far past its sell-by date shoe-horned into New Wave, until the back cover makes this [and Shrink’s desperate half-shaved hairstyle] most explicit.

Not quite cool in 1979...

Not quite cool in 1979…

Another Oval artist I’ve never heard of was Bobby Henry, who looked a little out of place, situated next to the outré Mr. Shrink. But the sleeve had at least one link to New Wave greatness: Oval friendly Lene Lovich was credited for the sweater Henry is wearing on the cover.

Oval/A+M | UK | 7" | 1979 | AMS 7408

Oval/A+M | UK | 7″ | 1979 | AMS 7408

Now I need to ask chasinvictoria is he has one of these UK LPs, since his “No Wave” collection is incomplete without it! The unimaginative cover has nothing on the exquisite North American sleeve by art director Chuck Beeson, who looked like he had a lot of frustration to work out from all of those Styx and Pablo Cruise sleeves that he had to chew on in the 70s.

– 30 –

 

About postpunkmonk

graphic design | software UI design | media design • record collector • satire • non-fiction
This entry was posted in A Young Person's Guide, New Wave Compilations and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to REDUX: A Young Person’s Guide To: No Wave

  1. slur says:

    Pretty funny from nowadays equality discussions going on to see the New Wave girl surfing on an ironing board. So the sound did not really move her to far away from her household duties…. (?!)

    Like

  2. I’d have to go back and look at what I wrote when this piece originally appeared, but I do of course have the picture-disc version and the US/Can variants, but I do not have all of the multitude of UK variants, so apparently I have a reason to carry on living until I do!!

    Like

  3. Mark Moerman says:

    There’s a very simple answer to the absence of The Stranglers from the Canadian LP: A&M did not have The Stranglers in Canada; United Artists did. So, some clever clock at A&M Canada found something to fill those two spots.

    Liked by 1 person

    • postpunkmonk says:

      Mark Moerman – Well that makes perfect sense. UA had an American division (think The Vapors) but I guess they didn’t have the confidence that Yanks would take The Stranglers to our collective bosoms.

      And they were wrong!

      Like

  4. Brian says:

    Thanks for showing that UK version. I have never seen that one before. No Wave was a pretty important comp in my youth.

    Like

  5. Echorich says:

    Your story about Ron Moss stirred up some rather unfortunate memories. Way back in 1982, while working on a degree in Music Management at Baruch College, CUNY, Ron was a guest speaker at a lecture series the department sponsored involving industry names. Ron had many stories, most of which veered towards the cautionary for anyone, like myself, that was interested in Artist + Repertoire. After the lecture, I got the chance to speak with him for a few minutes and he asked what music I listened to. He was well informed, as you would expect and even mentioned Derek Green, who I was aware of from the Sex Pistols, saying he thought I would enjoy some of Green’s stories of seeing Punk bands in rough pubs and abandoned buildings in England when everyone was searching to sign the band that would bring in the money. In the end, I found much of what Ron Moss had do say that day planted the seed that I needed to expand my Major away from just Music Management and think more broadly about Arts Management.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.